Category: Emerging Historians Series

Emerging Historians – Dr James Findlay

James

Dr James Findlay – AHA member since 2012

My name is James Findlay and I’m a historian with interests in media history, convict history, and settler colonialism in Australia.  I was awarded my PhD at the University of Sydney a few months ago.  Before returning to study I worked extensively in film and television production for companies and broadcasters including Beyond Television, Screenworld, Film Australia and the BBC in London. I’m currently sessional teaching with the History Department at USYD. Continue reading

Advertisements

Emerging Historians – Dr John Doyle

 

John Doyle (2)

Dr John Doyle – AHA member since 2013

I gained my PhD (on the political history of Australian telecommunications reform) from La Trobe University a few days before last Christmas, which was a rather pleasing way to round out the year. I was very fortunate at La Trobe to receive invaluable guidance and support from my supervisor, Professor Judith Brett, and many other colleagues. During my candidature, I tutored in Australian history and politics, coordinated a parliamentary internship program and also took some time off to consult to the telecommunications industry association, Communications Alliance. I’ve recently became an associate of the Contemporary Histories Research Group at Deakin University.  Continue reading

Emerging Historians – Dr Ana Stevenson

1. stevenson

Dr Ana Stevenson – AHA member since 2012

My name is Ana Stevenson and I completed my Ph.D. at The University of Queensland in 2015.  Between 2014 and 2015, I held the honorary position of Visiting Scholar in the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies Program at the University of Pittsburgh. Since January 2016, I have been a postdoctoral research fellow in the International Studies Group at the University of the Free State, South Africa.  I now live in Bloemfontein, a city I had never heard of before moving here. Continue reading

Emerging Historians – Dr Andonis Piperoglou

20171017_210417

Dr Andonis Piperoglou – AHA member since 2011

I am Andonis Piperoglou (some people call me Andoni/Αντώνη – it translates to Anthony in Greek). Please don’t confuse me with ‘Adonis’, for I am no modern day representation of classical antiquity. I’m twenty-nine years old, currently live in Canberra, and joined the AHA in 2011. This time last year I was anxiously waiting on my examiners reports, which, lucky for me, arrived in my inbox with a box ticked ‘without amendment or further examination’. I couldn’t believe it – in some ways I still can’t. I completed my dissertation at La Trobe University and was fortunate to have been mentored by a progressive group of La Trobeian historians. This year I have been teaching history at the Australian Catholic University in Strathfield, a cosy campus in Sydney’s inner west. Since graduating I have attended four conferences, engaged with a simulating cohort of Sydney-based historians, and submitted numerous job-applications and journal articles. I have also begun turning my thesis into a book – an exciting process! This is my, slightly politically charged, contribution to the AHA emerging historian series. Continue reading

Q&A with Douglas Wilkie

In this Q&A we talk with Dr Douglas Wilkie about his love of solving history puzzles and the difference between writing as a freelance and academic historian. He encourages all of us to do what we love, to research meticulously, and to tell a good story.

Continue reading

Emerging Historians – Dr Claire Higgins

 

1. Claire higgins

Dr Claire Higgins – AHA member since 2014

I completed my DPhil in History January 2014 at the University of Oxford. I am now a Senior Research Associate at the Andrew & Renata Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, UNSW. Continue reading

Emerging Historians – Dr Gemmia Burden

1. gb

Dr Gemmia Burden – AHA member since 2011

My name is Gemmia Burden (most of the people in my life call me Gemma). I started a PhD at the University of Queensland in 2010 and after 7 years (finally) finished earlier this year. I’m currently working two jobs, full time as a cultural heritage consultant at Australian Heritage Specialists, and as a casual research assistant for Associate Professor Anna Johnston at UQ’s Institute of Advanced Studies in the Humanities. Continue reading